Articles

2013 Archive

Small farm project demonstrates basic land management

One challenge facing the agriculture industry is the ever changing educational needs of producers. A growing segment of landowners are new producers who want to pursue a rural lifestyle or fulfill a dream of participating in agriculture.

Drought must be considered when applying prescribed fire

Fire is a natural process to which plant communities have adapted. Drought, which in recent years has been a major issue in the Southern Great Plains, is also a natural process to which these plant communities have adapted.

Healthy soil aids drought and flood management

Other than the lack or abundance of precipitation, the reason for droughts and floods is the soil's inability to effectively absorb and release water.

Studies examine nontraditional bermudagrass fertilizers

Numerous nontraditional fertilizers are being marketed with little replicated research demonstrating their effectiveness compared to traditional commercial sources of nitrogen, phosphorus and potassium.

Where's the Nuts?

My first couple of weeks as a summer scholar at the Noble Research Institute have allowed me to participate in a variety of activities, including those outside of my discipline.

Ready, Set, Go!

My first week at the Noble Research Institute in Ardmore, Okla., was great! After completing orientation, attending meetings and fulfilling HR requirements, our first experience as Lloyd Noble Scholars in Agriculture was being a part of the Pond Management Workshop and interacting with Noble wildlife specialists and local producers.

Here We Go!

Walking into the Noble Research Institute, I had few expectations beyond learning a tremendous amount and a melting summer (we Southern Oregonians are something of weather wimps).

Conserving roost sites helps maintain Rio Grande turkey

Fall and winter roost habitat may be the most critical and limited Rio Grande turkey habitat. Wild turkeys roost in relatively tall, mature trees with large crowns, spreading horizontal branches, and relatively few woody plants and tall herbaceous plants under their canopies.

New animal identification rules aid disease traceability

The USDA has initiated the Animal Disease Traceability Program to track interstate livestock movement. The new rule replaces the previous unpopular version of the National Animal Identification System and pertains to all livestock, including cattle, horses, sheep and goats.

Does fertilizer still pay for stocker operations?

The price of fertilizer has been on the rise, and old rules of thumb can no longer be used with today's high fertilizer and cattle prices.