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Charles Rohla, Ph.D. News

Moveable hoop houses provide flexibility, versatility

Hoop houses (high tunnels) have long been used by agricultural producers to extend the growing season and to establish crops earlier as compared to crops grown in the field.

Growth Potential

More and more, farmers and ranchers are planting pecan orchards, hoping to grow a brighter financial future. In support of the pecan growers, Charles Rohla, Ph.D., builds on more than 30 years of pecan research tradition at the Noble Research Institute, studying ways to maximize the wonder nut's production and developing more effective management strategies.

A Center for All

The new Center for Pecan and Specialty Agriculture adds opportunities for ag education and collaboration

A Shared Cause

Oklahoma State University and the Noble Research Institute build on a 70-year legacy of collaboration as they serve their home state and beyond.

National research project receives historic funding, set to advance DNA fingerprint system in pecans

Six national institutions have become the first multistate and multidisciplinary study to receive funding specifically to work on pecans.

Welcome to the Backyard

The Noble Research Institute is building a backyard. Four, actually. Cars zip by the agricultural research institution's campus on Highway 199 east of Ardmore, Oklahoma, every day. Now, just before...

Cracking Pecan's Problems

One of the first Americans to appreciate the flavor of pecans was George Washington, who planted the stately trees on the lawns of Mount Vernon in 1775. Yet true cultivation of the nuts wouldn't...

Pecan Research at the Noble Research Institute | Scab, Cultivar Genetics, Irrigation Studies

Noble's Manager of the Center for Pecans and Specialty Agriculture, Dr. Charles Rohla, brings us up to date on some of the pecan projects currently active at the Institute.

More than Plows, Cows, and Sows

When Center for Pecan and Specialty Agriculture manager Charles Rohla asked me to help at this year's Oklahoma Pecan Growers Association Convention, I was elated to expand my knowledge on this specialty crop.

Research Shows Promise to Help Growers Better Control Pecan Scab

Noble Research Institute researchers are studying ways to combat the pecan scab disease that decimates pecan orchards every year.

Getting Back To Cattle

Joe and Jeannie Dobson return to their roots to enjoy the family land after years of city life.

Fungicide and host resistance help control pecan scab

One of the most damaging diseases in pecans is pecan scab, caused by the fungus Fusicladium effusum. It infects actively growing tissue, such as stems, leaves and nut shucks, when temperatures are above 70 degrees Fahrenheit and relative humidity is above 90 percent.

Pecan alternate bearing challenges production

Pecan trees exhibit a strong tendency to produce a heavy crop one year, followed by one or more years of little to no production. This may best be characterized as alternate bearing with irregular symmetry.

Drought Stress on Pecan Trees

Drought conditions cause extreme stress on pecan trees. It is important for producers to understand the effects of drought and how pecan trees cope with the stress it brings.

Consider Pecan Management Decisions Over Coming Months

It is hard to believe that summer is almost upon us. This has the potential to be a heavy pecan crop year, if the drought has not hurt things too badly. To ensure a good crop, many management decisions need to be considered over the next few months, including proper fertilization and insect and disease control.

Pecan research moves into the 21st century

For decades, scientists have used molecular markers for research and breeding purposes to increase yields and water and nutrient efficiencies as well as disease and insect resistance in agricultural crops. Recently, pecan scientists have looked at the development of new technologies used in this research and considered its use in pecan breeding and research.

American Pecan Board establishes marketing order

The Federal Marketing Order was created to benefit the domestic and global pecan market.

A Helping Hand for Agricultural Producers

To help people stay engaged in agriculture, the AgrAbility Project was created in 1991 as part of the 1990 Farm Bill. Currently, 24 states have AgrAbility Projects to assist agricultural producers with disabilities.

Balanced fertilization program supports pecan growth

Fertilization is just one pecan management practice that helps maximize crop production and provides optimal tree maintenance. Proper fertilization encourages growth of shoots and leaves, which is essential for increasing crop load and decreasing tree stress.

Pecan Leaf Sampling

Nutrient management is essential for a successful pecan orchard or grove. With the high cost of fertilizer and the labor required for application, it is critical to accurately account for the nutrient needs of the tree for successful pecan management.

Research updates pecan tree fertilizer recommendations

Proper fertilization can decrease stress and improve the health and development of trees. Annual application of nitrogen and adequate levels of phosphorus have been shown to help reduce alternate bearing in pecan trees.

Improving Native Pecan Groves

Mother Nature has blessed several landowners in Oklahoma and Texas with a potential income enterprise. Native pecans are found along the rivers, streams and creeks in both states. On average, 35 million pounds of native pecans are harvested from both states.

Federal Pecan Marketing Order aims to stabilize market

In 2015, I wrote about the proposed Federal Marketing Order (FMO) for pecans. On May 6, 2016, the U.S. Department of Agriculture announced that the order passed by an overwhelming majority of pecan...

Pecan Production 101

Pecan is an important crop in the Southern Great Plains. Recent USDA crop statistics report 175,542 acres of pecans in Texas and 141,765 acres in Oklahoma, with the majority of the acreage consisting...

Assessing the Value of Pecan Trees

It is the intent of this publication to provide methodology that appraisers, tax preparers and other interested parties can use in determining the value of pecan trees. View Publication

Watch Out for the Pecan Nut Casebearer

Pecan nut casebearer (PNC) is found throughout our pecan growing region and can be economically devastating to pecan producers. There are two to four generations of PNC per year with a new generation...

Best Pecans Cultivars for Oklahoma, Texas

Charles Rohla, Ph.D., shares information to help pecan growers choose the best cultivars to grow in Oklahoma and Texas.

U.S. Pecan Growers Face Devastating Storms, Tariff Trouble

History has shown that the pecan industry is resilient, but the tariff trouble is proving to be just one hurdle the U.S. pecan industry needs to overcome. Thanks to recent storms, pecan growers now have bigger problems.

Orange Pecan Bread

Try this award-winning recipe for a citrus-infused quick bread loaded with America’s native nut.

Pecan Tree Grafting: Four- flap (Banana) Graft, "American Method"

Dr. Charles Rohla, pecan researcher at Noble Research Institute, demonstrates a four-flap (or "banana") graft on a pecan tree seedling.

Cross pollination is essential for pecan production

Adequate pollinators within the pecan orchard are imperative for optimal production.

Shaping Up Pecans with Irrigation

Installation of an irrigation system is one of the most important steps in establishing a new pecan orchard. Water is critical to produce healthy trees capable of optimal fruit production.

Pecan Grafting: Texas Inlay Bark Graft, "American Method"

Dr. Charles Rohla, pecan researcher at Noble Research Institute, demonstrates a Texas inlay bark graft on a pecan tree seedling.