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Mesonet Collects Weather Data in Real-Time

Noble research and demonstration farms and ranches host three Mesonet sites, which help producers across the state adjust to fluctuating climate pressures.

By Arielle Farve

Posted Oct. 11, 2018

No farmer has won a fight with the weather. Temperature, wind and precipitation can quickly change from agriculture’s unyielding adversaries to its allies. Since weather determines the difference between a decent or disastrous harvest, farmers and ranchers need accurate real-time forecasts. For Oklahoma farmers and ranchers, the best tool to combat Mother Nature’s vagaries is the statewide monitoring system called the Mesonet.

Map showing 120 Mesonet weather monitoring stations across the state of Oklahoma.

Measurements Every 5 Minutes

The Mesonet takes the guesswork out of weather prediction thanks to a network of 120 monitoring stations that includes at least one weather tower in each of Oklahoma’s 77 counties. The automated stations transmit measurements to a central facility every five minutes, every day. This system features weather monitoring basics plus multiple maps detailing soil temperature, changes in dewpoint, cattle comfort and other measures across the state.

Access Online or in App

All the real-time updates can be viewed for free online or in the Mesonet app. The Oklahoma Climatological Survey (OCS) at the University of Oklahoma receives every measurement the towers collect and verifies the information to ensure its accuracy. It takes less than 10 minutes for measurements to be uploaded online for use by farmers and ranchers across the state.

Weather Data for Ag

The Mesonet is a cooperative venture between Oklahoma State University and the University of Oklahoma. OSU’s primary goal at the Mesonet’s founding in 1994 was to expand the use of weather data in agricultural applications. The project remains the gold standard for weather monitoring networks and offers the ultimate hack for Oklahoma farmers and ranchers in the digital era.

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