1. Blog
  2. One Noble Summer

Florida, more than a vacation

By Dyson Runyan, 2015 Lloyd Noble Scholar in Agriculture

Posted Jul. 21, 2015

Fellow Ag Scholar Garth Gatson, agricultural consultant Clay Wright and I left the Noble Research Institute at 5 a.m., Monday, July 13, for Dallas to board a plane bound for the beautiful sunshine state. We were not going there for the tropical weather, white beach sand or the one-of-a-kind sunsets. In fact, we were headed to the American Society of Animal Science/American Dairy Science Association joint annual meeting (JAM).

The JAM meeting was a wonderful opportunity to meet some of the leading scientists and professors in the industry as well as to learn about the research they have done and the master's and doctoral students' research they have advised. JAM presents a diverse scientific program offering more than 2,200 oral and poster presentations from scientists from around the globe. We got to opportunity to pick and choose between more than 40 symposia, workshops, and pre-conference events presented by the world's leading animal and dairy scientists. Topics included animal health and well-being, dairy food science, dairy production, animal and human nutrition, livestock transport, food safety, and production and management. In the downtime between sessions, we had the opportunity to attend the trade show, which had more than 50 attendees from multiple countries that dealt with all sides of research.

All in all, it was a great conference. I had a great opportunity to learn about all sides of agriculture and just how in-depth research can be. We were three of more than 4,000 people at the meeting in Florida there for the science and to learn from professionals. I even got to eat a one-of-a-kind steak from Charlie's Steakhouse, which I hear is a consultant favorite. Even if it is in Orlando. So I owe the Noble Research Institute a thank you. It was real. It was fun. And it was real fun!

About the Author

Dyson Runyan is a 2015 Lloyd Noble Scholar in Plant Science from Madill, Oklahoma. Runyan grew up on a 15 to 30-head show pig farm and helped manage a 50-head show goat operation. He is a senior at Oklahoma State University, majoring in animal science and minoring in business.

Comments