Drought

Managing Pastures During Drought

Exceptional drought robbed pasture and range managers of the 2011 forage production they were counting on to get to the traditional winter feeding period. Thus, many are left trying to feed their way through this drought or destock to better match forage demand to forage availability.

Watch Out for These Weeds in Drought

With the drought-induced import of vast quantities of hay into Oklahoma and Texas from neighboring states and beyond, there is a risk that invasive weeds will be brought in with that hay.

Looking Ahead at 2012 Sprayer Needs

Timing is critical for effective weed control using herbicides. Although there aren't enough hours in the day for them to cover all the acres that need to be sprayed each spring and summer.

The Potential for Grazing Winter Pasture With Cows

In most years, winter pasture would be planted by Sept. 1 and some fields would be turning green at the start of October. However, throughout southern Oklahoma and northern Texas in 2011, this may not be the case because of the drought.

White-tailed Deer Management During Drought

With the 2011 drought in the Southern Great Plains, many people are curious to know if conditions have affected deer populations and if there is anything to be done to mitigate potential effects.

Pasture Weed Management and Drought

Pasture weed management always presents a challenge. There are dynamic, complex interactions between desirable forages, grazing animals, encroaching weeds, soil types, nutrient levels, climate and...

Winter Pasture Options Following Summer Drought

The drought conditions have left forage resources for this year's fall and winter in short supply for most producers. Over the last couple of months, calves have been early weaned and cattle herds have been culled heavily, relocated to pasture or completely dispersed.

Determining the Value of Weathered Hay

The drought of 2011 is set to go down in the record books as one of the most severe in history. Most livestock producers in the Southern Great Plains have not been able to put up enough hay to meet their requirements in a normal growing season, let alone during a drought when they will have to start feeding hay earlier in the year.

Does Lime Pay on Winter Pasture?

Let's say you look at the results from your soil sample and see there is a recommendation for lime. You check around and discover this is going to cost $40-$50 per acre. A normal person would question whether the value received from liming is worth the cost.

Drought-induced Cattle Poisoning

Cattle producers should be on watch for two types of poisoning during drought. The potential for nitrate and prussic acid poisoning of cattle is most often associated with dry periods; therefore, livestock owners should take precautions, including forage testing. Often the first indication of a problem is one or more dead animals.