1. Staff

James Locke News

Seed Tags: What Is on Them?

A good crop starts with good seed. Much of the information producers need to know is on seed certification, analysis and treatment tags.

It Takes Confidence

Dave Wingo turns a hobby into an integral part of his farming and ranching operations.

Bermudagrass recovery requires managing ryegrass

This article provides management guidelines to benefit from ryegrass while encouraging bermudagrass recovery. While the focus is on ryegrass in bermudagrass, the same principles apply to other cool-season annuals in other warm-season perennial grasses.

Seeding guidelines increase winter pasture productivity

A few of the benefits of sod-seeding small grain winter pasture include providing high quality forage during the winter months, providing additional forage production during the warm-season grass's dormant season and potentially reducing the need for winter supplementation.

Establishing Winter Pasture: Start Out Right

Productive winter pasture can be a valuable asset, but can also be expensive to establish and grow.

How to Calibrate a Boom Sprayer: 1/128 of an acre method

James Locke demonstrates the 1/128 of an acre method for calibrating a boom sprayer. Locke is a soils and crops consultant for the Samuel Roberts Noble Research Institute.

Winter pastures benefit from in-season tips

Fertilizer and lime, pest, and grazing management recommendations to promote productive winter pastures.

Summer Nitrogen Sources - Which Is Best?

Now that ammonium nitrate has become so expensive and all but impossible to get, anyone who needs to apply nitrogen during hot weather should evaluate the alternatives.

How to Calibrate a Boomless Sprayer: 1/8 of an acre method

James Locke demonstrates the 1/8 of an acre method for calibrating a boomless sprayer. Locke is a soils and crops consultant for the Samuel Roberts Noble Research Institute.

Economics, residual nitrogen drive topdressing decisions

Adequate nitrogen is necessary for optimizing winter pasture production. One consideration for providing adequate nitrogen is to maximize nitrogen use efficiency (NUE). One way to improve NUE is to apply nitrogen during the late winter as a topdress application.

Herbicide Management During Drought

As if to add insult to injury, drought conditions make weed control even more challenging and important than usual. Weeds compete for light, nutrients, space and, most importantly during a drought, water.

Summer weed management promotes healthy pastures

If early-season weeds are not controlled, they will compete with desirable forages for space, nutrients, moisture and sunlight.

2012: Drought Recovery or Drought Persistence?

As I write this month's article, most producers are feeling more optimistic because we have had some rain and it has cooled off. The 100-plus degree days of the past summer are a bad memory.

Five Ways to Stretch Your Fertilizer Dollar

With many analysts predicting that fertilizer use will return to normal levels during 2011 and expected tight supplies, higher prices are on the way.

Sprayer calibration promotes safe, effective pesticide use

Resources are available to help properly calibrate boom, boomless and air blast sprayers.

Helpful tips reduce risk of pesticide drift

As long as pesticides have been used, off-target spray drift has been a potential problem. As we move into the busiest time of year for pesticide applications, it is a good time for a brief review of the primary types of pesticide drift and some tips on how to minimize them.

Economics, timing drive pesticide application decisions

Spring is the season when most begin thinking about controlling weeds and other pests. Producers who choose to control pests with chemicals are faced with deciding whether to hire a commercial custom applicator or to self-apply pesticides to their own property or crops.

Is Now the Time to Fertilize Bermudagrass?

Fertilizer prices are high and we are suffering severe drought conditions. Why would anyone consider fertilizing bermudagrass or other warm-season grasses now? There are good reasons to consider a late summer or early fall fertilization program, namely to extend the grazing season and improve the quality of available forage.

'Law of the Minimum' prioritizes action

Justus von Liebig's Law of the Minimum is an agronomic theory that states yield is proportional to the amount of the most limiting nutrient - whichever nutrient it may be.

Grasshoppers: Will This Be a Big Year?

Grasshoppers are considered an intermittent problem in Oklahoma and North Texas pastures. However, when they are present in large numbers, the damage can be severe.

Herbicide choices affect cover crop options, management

Do not let the wrong herbicide and cover crop combination diminish the opportunity for great value.

Fall Armyworms: Identification, Damage Indications and Control

If left untreated, fall armyworms (Spodoptera frugiperda) can destroy a pasture or field of crops in a very short time. James Locke, soils and crops consultant, shows you how to identify the fall...

Pecan Production 101

Pecan is an important crop in the Southern Great Plains. Recent USDA crop statistics report 175,542 acres of pecans in Texas and 141,765 acres in Oklahoma, with the majority of the acreage consisting...

Sandbur Control in Bermudagrass Pastures and Hay Fields

Sandbur generally behave as summer annual grasses, although they will sometimes act as weak perennials. While they are different species, they all share the common trait of being undesirable in...

Using Aminopyralid Preemergent in Pastures for Western Ragweed Control

Western ragweed (Ambrosia psilostachya) is considered one of the most common weeds in pastures and rangeland in the Southern Great Plains. It is an aggressive competitor with grasses and is generally...

Orchard/Air Blast Sprayer Calibration

Orchard, or air blast, sprayers are the most common pieces of equipment used to apply foliar insecticides, fungicides, plant growth regulators and foliar nutrients to tree crops. In order to apply...

Eastern Persimmon: Identification and Management in Pastures and Rangeland

Eastern persimmon (Diospyros virginiana L.) is a native tree species also known as common persimmon, possumwood, American ebony, white ebony and butterwood. It has a natural range that extends from...

Osage Orange: Identification and Management

Osage orange [Maclura pomifera (RAF.) C. Schneider] is a native tree species also known as bois d'arc, hedge apple, bodark, horse apple and bowwood. Its natural range was limited primarily to the Red...

Pasture Weed Management and Drought

Pasture weed management always presents a challenge. There are dynamic, complex interactions between desirable forages, grazing animals, encroaching weeds, soil types, nutrient levels, climate and...

Greenbrier: Identification and Management

Greenbrier (Smilax bona-nox L.) is a native woody vine or shrub. It is a member of the Smilacaceae, formerly Liliaceae, family which includes approximately 12 to 15 species in the Smilax genus. View...

Tall Fescue: History, Application, Establishment and Management

Tall fescue [Lolium arundinaceum (Schreb.) Darbysh = Festuca arundinacea] is an introduced, cool-season, perennial grass that is native from Europe to Siberia and into North Africa. The date of the...

Blackberry: Identification and Management in Pasture and Rangeland

Blackberry (Rubus sp.) are native (usually) woody shrubs or brambles. They are members of the Rosaceae, or rose family, which includes over 600 species and developed varieties of blackberries,...

Quality Seed: The First Step to a Successful Crop

We can't control weather and markets, but we can almost always use good quality seed. James Locke, soils and crops consultant, shares the components of quality seed.

Questions to Ask When Choosing Crop Land

Consider terrain, soil type and fertility, water, weed and brush encroachment, and forage resources before buying land with the goal of crop or hay production.

Ask the Expert: James Locke

James Locke, soils and crops consultant, provides a historical perspective on the impact of agriculture practices on the environment and how modern agriculture is able to do more with less.

Honey Locust: Identification and Management

Honey locust (Gleditisia triacanthos L.) is a native tree species with a natural range that extends from central Pennsylvania to South Dakota to southeastern Texas to Alabama. At maturity, trees may...

Armyworms: What You Need to Know

The key to keeping armyworms below the economic threshold is scouting for activity at least every other day, when they are small and easier to control, as well as identifying if you have fall armyworms or beet armyworms.

How to Calibrate a Boom Sprayer: 1/128 of an acre method

James Locke demonstrates the 1/128 of an acre method for calibrating a boom sprayer. Locke is a soils and crops consultant for the Noble Research Institute.

How to Calibrate a Boomless Sprayer: 1/8 of an acre method

James Locke demonstrates the 1/8 of an acre method for calibrating a boomless sprayer. Locke is a soils and crops consultant for the Noble Research Institute.

Seed Tags: What Is on Them?

A good crop starts with good seed. Much of the information producers need to know is on seed certification, analysis and treatment tags.

The Why, What and How of Overseeding Annual Crops in Perennial Pastures

Before you overseed a perennial pasture with an annual crop, determine your goals, what type of perennial crop you have and your planting method.

Invasive Plants Are a Threat to Agriculture

Some of the most serious invasive plants in the Great Plains are the old world bluestems (i.e. yellow, Caucasian, plains, King Ranch, B. Dahl), sericea lespedeza, eastern redcedar, musk thistle, Bradford or callery pear, and salt cedar.

Weed Management in Pecans

An effective weed management program is a necessary part of any pecan production enterprise. Weeds compete with pecans for water and nutrients, and may have allelopathic effects on pecan growth....

Stockpiled forages reduce hay feeding

In most operations, hay feeding represents a large portion of a cow's annual maintenance cost. The cost of feeding hay includes much more than just the production cost or purchase price of the hay.