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Results for pages tagged with "yield"

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  • All Articles
  • Publications
  • Noble News and Views
  • 2014
  • May

Fungicide and host resistance help control pecan scab

One of the most damaging diseases in pecans is pecan scab, caused by the fungus Fusicladium effusum. It infects actively growing tissue, such as stems, leaves and nut shucks, when temperatures are above 70 degrees Fahrenheit and relative humidity is above 90 percent.
  • All Articles
  • Publications
  • Noble News and Views
  • 2013
  • September

Proper liming, fertilizing increases winter pasture profit

Lime and fertilizer make up a substantial portion of the costs of producing winter pasture. Lime may or may not be needed - only a soil test can tell you for sure. If lime is recommended, its application can pay good dividends.
  • All Articles
  • Publications
  • Noble News and Views
  • 2013
  • October

Pecan research moves into the 21st century

For decades, scientists have used molecular markers for research and breeding purposes to increase yields and water and nutrient efficiencies as well as disease and insect resistance in agricultural crops. Recently, pecan scientists have looked at the development of new technologies used in this research and considered its use in pecan breeding and research.
  • All Articles
  • Publications
  • Noble News and Views
  • 2011
  • September

Does Lime Pay on Winter Pasture?

Let's say you look at the results from your soil sample and see there is a recommendation for lime. You check around and discover this is going to cost $40-$50 per acre. A normal person would question whether the value received from liming is worth the cost.
  • All Articles
  • Publications
  • Noble News and Views
  • 2011
  • November

You May Not Need to Use Nitrogen on Wheat in 2011

As we approach the end of 2011, many soil sample results have considerably higher than average amounts of nitrates, especially in wheat and winter pasture fields.
  • All Articles
  • Publications
  • Noble News and Views
  • 2011
  • May

Sesame as an Alternative Crop

Sesame is one of the most ancient oilseed crops and is used for cooking and other culinary preparations in various parts of the world. Sesame seed contains 50 percent oil and 25 percent protein.
  • All Articles
  • Publications
  • Noble News and Views
  • 2013
  • October

New testing methods measure soil organics

Traditional soil test methods have typically involved treating a soil sample with various acids and other reagents to extract a portion of the inorganic nutrients in the soil. This can hopefully be done with as few processes as possible to be fast and cheap, and fit the industrial model.
  • All Articles
  • Publications
  • Noble News and Views
  • 2013
  • June

Studies examine nontraditional bermudagrass fertilizers

Numerous nontraditional fertilizers are being marketed with little replicated research demonstrating their effectiveness compared to traditional commercial sources of nitrogen, phosphorus and potassium.
  • All Articles
  • Publications
  • Noble News and Views
  • 2018
  • January

Consider Your Options: Graze-out vs. Harvesting Wheat

Economist Myriah Johnson offers advice to beef producers considering whether they should pull cattle off wheat pastures so grain can be harvested or leave the cattle through graze-out.

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