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Results for pages tagged with "invasive"

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  • All Articles
  • Publications
  • Noble News and Views
  • 2011
  • October

Watch Out for These Weeds in Drought

With the drought-induced import of vast quantities of hay into Oklahoma and Texas from neighboring states and beyond, there is a risk that invasive weeds will be brought in with that hay.
  • All Articles
  • Publications
  • Noble News and Views
  • 2009
  • February

Controlling Eastern Red-cedar, a Common Noxious Weed

Eastern Red-cedar trees have become more abundant in many fence rows and pastures. This now very common tree was once limited to rocky bluffs, deep canyons and other areas where fire did not historically occur.
  • All Articles
  • Publications
  • Noble News and Views
  • 2016
  • December

Introduced grasses can cause problems for wildlife

Across the United States, introduced and invasive plant species have displaced and replaced many native plant species. These plants are spreading across the landscape primarily due to human...
  • All Articles
  • Publications
  • Noble News and Views
  • 2018
  • May 2018

Aquatic Plant Spotlight: Hydrilla

Hydrilla (Hydrilla verticillata) is a nonnative, invasive aquatic plant that is rooted and can grow to almost 30 feet, filling up the water column. The best way to control it is to prevent its spread.

  • All Articles
  • Publications
  • Noble News and Views
  • 2020
  • May 2020

Invasive Plants Are a Threat to Agriculture

Some of the most serious invasive plants in the Great Plains are the old world bluestems (i.e. yellow, Caucasian, plains, King Ranch, B. Dahl), sericea lespedeza, eastern redcedar, musk thistle, Bradford or callery pear, and salt cedar.