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Results for pages tagged with "fungi"

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  • News
  • News Releases

New journal tabs Noble Research Institute scientist as first editor

Noble Research Institute Associate Professor Carolyn Young, Ph.D., has been named editor-in-chief of the American Phytopathological Society (APS) Phytobiomes journal.

  • News
  • Publications
  • Noble News and Views
  • 2018
  • March 2018

Soil microbes can suppress plant disease

Scientists are gaining a better understanding of soil microbes and how they could help control cotton root rot in alfalfa.

  • News
  • Publications
  • Legacy
  • 2013
  • Fall 2013

Carolyn Young

A native of New Zealand, Carolyn Young, Ph.D., leads a mycology lab at the Noble Research Institute with the goal of producing improved forage grasses, a staple of grazing livestock.
  • News
  • Publications
  • Noble News and Views
  • 2018
  • April 2018

An Introduction to the Rumen Microbiome

The rumen microbiome is very complex, and the diversity of ruminal microorganisms can be affected by diet composition, genetics and environmental factors.

  • Research
  • Areas of Research

Plant-Microbe Interactions

Plant-microbe interactions describe a broad range of scientific studies concerning how microbes interact with plants at the molecular biology and molecular genetics level. Plants and microbes can...
  • Blog

April 16 to April 22: Learning and Teaching

By definition, a researcher is one who dedicates their career to learning, exploring, asking questions and finding answers. At the Noble Research Institute, these life-long learners also enjoy...
  • News
  • Research Updates

Fungus Could Boost Winter Wheat Productivity, Improve Soil and Conserve Water

Serendipita bescii can improve root development and increase overall forage biomass and grain yield in winter wheat, especially in nutritionally poor soil and limited water conditions.

  • Staff

Kelly Craven, Ph.D.

Current Research The Problem A confluence of events including an increase in population from 7 billion people to 11 billion by 2100 and a dwindling world supply of arable crop land and rock...