1. All Articles
  2. News Releases

New Summer-Dormant Tall Fescue Variety Released

  Estimated read time:

ARDMORE, Okla. — Noble Research Institute researchers have developed and released a new tall fescue variety called Chisholm to provide a new forage option for agricultural producers in western Oklahoma and Texas.

Tall fescue is a cool-season perennial grass, which means it produces forage for livestock from fall to spring and does not need to be replanted each year. Chisholm is the first tall fescue variety released by Noble that is adapted to the hot, dry summers typical west of Interstate 35 in Oklahoma and Texas, where tall fescue has traditionally been unable to persist.

"A goal of Noble's plant breeding program has been to develop a cool-season perennial grass that could provide producers with an alternative to planting winter annuals, like wheat and cereal rye, each season," said Mike Trammell, Noble Research Institute senior plant breeder. "Chisholm, a cool-season perennial, could complement or replace winter annual grazing systems, providing more grazing flexibility to livestock producers or reducing their need to feed hay when bermudagrass is dormant."

Chisholm was developed from Mediterranean tall fescue, which persists in environmental conditions similar to the Southern Great Plains. In the past, many introduced cool-season perennial grasses were selected from cooler climates in northern Europe. As a result, these grasses were unable to persist in the hot and dry summers typical of western Oklahoma and Texas.

Mediterranean-type tall fescue varieties, including Chisholm, are summer-dormant, which means they stop growing during the summer in response to long days, high temperatures and dry conditions. They start growing again in early fall in response to moisture and cooler temperatures.

Perennial grasses like Chisholm can also benefit soil health by sequestering carbon in the soil year-round, improving organic matter and reducing soil erosion.

Chisholm is available for purchase through Warner Brothers Seed Company in Lawton, Oklahoma. For more information, read Mike Trammell's latest article in Noble News and Views.

Photos
Chisholm tall fescue pasture during the early spring growing period.Chisholm tall fescue pasture during the early spring growing period.
Chisholm tall fescue pasture in dormancy during the summer.Chisholm tall fescue pasture in dormancy during the summer.

Noble Research Institute, LLC (www.noble.org) is an independent nonprofit agricultural research organization dedicated to delivering solutions to great agricultural challenges. Headquartered in Ardmore, Oklahoma, Noble’s goal is to achieve regenerative land stewardship in grazing animal production with producer profitability. Achievement of this goal will be measured by farmers and ranchers profitably regenerating hundreds of millions of acres of U.S. grazing lands. Noble aims to remove, mitigate or help producers avoid the barriers that deter the lasting use of regenerative, profitable land management practices in grazing animal production.

Researchers, consultants, educators and ranch staff work together to give farmers and ranchers the skills and tools to regenerate the land in a profitable manner. Noble researchers and educators seek and deliver answers to producer questions concerning regenerative management of pasture and range environments, wildlife, pecan production, and livestock production. Regenerative management recognizes that each decision made on the ranch impacts the interactions of the soil, plants, water, animals and producers. Noble’s 14,000 acres of working ranch lands provide a living laboratory on which to demonstrate and practice regenerative principles and ideas to deliver value to farmers and ranchers across the U.S.

For media inquiries concerning the Noble Research Institute, please contact:
J. Adam Calaway, Director of Communications and Public Relations
580-224-6209 | 580-224-6208 fax

Ryan McNeill, Digital Marketing Manager | 580-224-6364

For article reprint information, please visit our Media page.

Visit Media Page

Comments