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From Research To A Field Near You

Posted Oct. 18, 2019

Since 1956, Noble Research Institute has released 25 forage varieties.

Plant Breeding

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Plant breeding is the art and science of changing plant genetics in order to create new varieties with increased productivity or value-added traits, such as drought tolerance, nutritional value or disease resistance. Noble Research Institute develops improved varieties of small grains (wheat, rye, triticale and oat) and perennial cool-season forages (tall fescue and alfalfa).

Most small grains breeding programs in the U.S. are focused on grain yield and quality. However, Noble’s small grains breeding program develops cultivars with improved forage qualities, better fall production, and the ability to recover after grazing with better overall forage yields. Perennial cool-season forage breeding aims to help fill the forge gap when bermudagrass is dormant in the Great Plains thus reducing the need to feed hay over the winter. Traits selected for include grazing persistence, heat and drought tolerance, winter survival, high biomass, seed yield, forage quality, and disease resistance.

1956

Elbon Rye

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1966

Bonel Rye

1975

Maton Rye

1988

Red River Crabgrass

1993

Oklon Rye

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1995

Bates Rye

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1999

Midland 99 Bermudagrass

(co-release with USDA Agricultural Research Service Grazinglands Laboratory, Arkansas Agricultural Experiment Station, Missouri Agricultural Experiment Station and Kansas Agricultural Experiment Station)

2002

NF-1 compass plant
NF-1 compass plant with profuse ligules

2007

Maton II Rye

2008

EG 1101 switchgrass
EG 1102 switchgrass
EG 2101 switchgrass

2009

NFLT12 Darnel Ryegrass

2011

Texoma MaxQ II Tall Fescue

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2013

NF201 triticale
Bates RS4 rye
Heavy Grazer II oat
NF402 oat

2014

NF101 wheat
NFTW6001 tall wheatgrass
Plainsmen tall wheatgrass

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2016

Impact Crabgrass
Chisholm Summer Dormant Tall Fescue
Renovation White Clover

(co-release with University of Georgia)

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