News

'Noble News and Views' Category

White-Tailed Deer Facts, Findings and Numbers

A look at 2016-2017 deer harvest numbers and trends for Oklahoma, Texas, the Southeast and U.S. provides insight for land managers and hunters.

Offsetting Winter Supplementation With Pasture

Noble Research Institute researchers have been looking at two methods in cow-calf production to extend the grazing season on bermudagrass-based pastures and reduce winter feeding of stored feeds.

One Noble Summer: About the Lloyd Noble Scholars Program

In 2018, 19 students joined the Noble Research Institute for a summer of hands-on research and the opportunity to explore agriculture.

Students Test Their Knowledge of Natural Resources

The Oklahoma Envirothon is a team-based competition for high school students interested in learning about the fundamentals of natural resource management.

Noble Microscopes: Inspiring the Next Generation of Ag Scientists

Microscopes have become an integral component of youth education programs at the Noble Research Institute and throughout Oklahoma.

Youth Hunts Provide Memories, Opportunities

Oklahoma landowners are able to help develop the next generation of hunters through the youth hunt program.

Noble’s Graduate Education Experience

Meet the graduate students furthering their education and research experiences at the Noble Research Institute.

Noble, Southern Tech Collaboration Heightens Students’ Experience

Students gain interactive, real-world experiences in science and agriculture as part of a partnership between Noble Learning’s youth education program and Southern Tech’s Biotechnology Academy.

Pecan Management Calendar: August to October

Pecan growers should develop a plan for preparing for and addressing tasks throughout the year. Will Chaney, a senior research associate in pecan management systems, outlines activities for August, September and October.

Fall Webworms Are Back! Here’s How to Control Them

Entomologists tell us that webworm outbreaks run in cycles. Some years outbreaks are severe, while in other years they are barely noticed. Weather, birds and the predatory insect population contribute to the circular nature of these outbreaks. Heavy, driving rains can flush the worms from the foliage early in the season, reducing the level of damage.