News

Finding Strength and Beauty Among the Weeds

In Uganda, as in nature, survival skills are something to be admired.

A Noble Experiment in Uganda: The Soil is Alive

Ugandan teens dig in for lesson on soil microbes.

Ecosystem Services Market Program: Protocol Development Team Kick-off and Progress

The ESM team has continued with collaborative engagement activities across the full range of the agricultural supply and value chains, including with farm and ranching communities, commodity groups, and potential corporate partners.  Work also continues on technical issues, including development of the technical and logistical requirements of a platform to collect and store data and track progress of the overall program.

National Award Honors Calaway's Contribution to Publishing

Noble Research Institute Director of Communications and Public Relations J. Adam Calaway received the 2018 Association for Communication Excellence (ACE) Award of Excellence in Publishing and Graphic Design at this year's conference in Scottsdale, Arizona.

Ecosystem Services Market Update: August 8, 2018

A quick high level update on a number of activities pertinent to the Ecosystem Services Market program. Thanks to those active ESM members for their continuous contributions to this ambitious effort.

Lloyd Noble Scholar Program Offers Range of In-the-Field Experiences

From academic experts to everyday actions, lessons bring soil health practices to life.

Raising the Crops and Raising the Children

Hard-working women at the heart of Ugandan agriculture.

Pecan Management Calendar: August to October

Pecan growers should develop a plan for preparing for and addressing tasks throughout the year. Will Chaney, a senior research associate in pecan management systems, outlines activities for August, September and October.

Fall Webworms Are Back! Here’s How to Control Them

Entomologists tell us that webworm outbreaks run in cycles. Some years outbreaks are severe, while in other years they are barely noticed. Weather, birds and the predatory insect population contribute to the circular nature of these outbreaks. Heavy, driving rains can flush the worms from the foliage early in the season, reducing the level of damage.

High-Tech Traps Are Worth the Investment

Feral hogs have plagued agricultural lands in Oklahoma for long enough that most landowners have adopted some sort of control strategy on their properties.