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So long, farewell

By Sarah Oliver, 2016 Noble Summer Research Scholar in Plant Science

Posted Aug. 5, 2016

Ten weeks passes by much faster than you would expect. It would be an understatement to say that I will miss researching at the Noble Research Institute.

I am very grateful to my lab for welcoming me into their research space this summer. I especially am grateful for my mentor, Cheng Lin Chai, Ph.D., who encouraged me to challenge myself and to maximize the opportunities of my summer experience. It seems cliché to say my favorite part of working at the Noble Research Institute was the people. But nothing could be truer. I feel blessed to have had the opportunity to work with such a supportive community this summer. Throughout my time here, I have enjoyed meeting individuals from all divisions who are passionate and motivated about the Noble Research Institute's impact on agriculture.

final research presentationsThe 2016 Noble Summer Research Scholars after their final research presentations in Kruse Auditorium.

The Noble Summer Research Scholar in Plant Science program does a wonderful job of integrating its scholars, not only into their labs, but into the community as a whole. It has been a privilege to spend the summer with my fellow Noble Summer Research Scholars and to learn more about their own interests and fields of study. We have shared many fun experiences, including thrift shopping downtown, bowling on the weekend, hiking in the Wichita Mountains, and eating snow cones together at Family Movie Night. As we return to our hometowns and to our universities, we leave the Noble Research Institute with many fond memories. I could not think of a group with whom I would have rather shared my One Noble Summer.

About the Author

Sarah Oliver is a 2016 Lloyd Noble Scholar in Plant Science from Ardmore, Oklahoma. She is majoring in biochemistry at Oklahoma State University. Her summer project involves phenotypic and molecular characterization of root system architecture mutants in Medicago truncatula.