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Beginning a summer experience like no other

By Dyson Runyan, 2015 Lloyd Noble Scholar in Agriculture

Posted Jun. 18, 2015

Growing up in Madill, just east of the Noble Research Institute, I have always known the significance and the responsibility it was to be a Lloyd Noble Scholar in Agriculture. I knew that it was going to be a very eventful summer that would require me to learn and work incredibly hard on projects, while still managing to have fun in the meantime. My first days at the Noble Research Institute have been far from boring!

We were all told in an email from Becca McMillan, executive assistant to the senior vice president and division director in the Agricultural Division, that when we arrived we should be prepared to “jump right in” and get to work. Between all the normal job, safety and defensive driving orientations, we all became believers that the summer was going to be fun. We all have been plenty busy even with abnormal rainfall keeping us cooped up inside.

As soon as the rain quit and the sun came out, we all were out doing different activities outside ranging from Noble Research Institute farm tours to our own individual one-on-one time with a cooperator, accompanied by a consultant. We even have our own piece of the Noble Research Institute Community Garden, where we are currently raising tomatoes and peppers. It sure is going to make some mean salsa!

All in all, even though it’s been a short time since I have been here, I can honestly say that this scholarship program is like no other. Every Noble Research Institute employee treats me like I have been here for years, and they all meet the whole definition of “advocate for agriculture.” I already know I am in good hands at the Noble Research Institute, and I also know that they have big plans for us for the rest of the summer. I certainly am looking forward to it.

scholars group photoThe Lloyd Noble Scholars in Agriculture after visiting Whitetail Meadows, a ranch in Sunset, Texas. The scholars learned about different forages used by livestock and wildlife.

About the Author

Dyson Runyan is a 2015 Lloyd Noble Scholar in Plant Science from Madill, Oklahoma. Runyan grew up on a 15 to 30-head show pig farm and helped manage a 50-head show goat operation. He is a senior at Oklahoma State University, majoring in animal science and minoring in business.

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