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Last Week in Noble Research: To Space, India and the Ranch

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Posted Feb. 28, 2017

Noble Research Institute researchers work toward agricultural advancements for the benefit of farmers, ranchers and consumers in the Southern Great Plains and beyond – perhaps even to outer space one day.

Here's a little look at last week in research at the Noble Research Institute.

  1 Sunday, Feb. 19

Reminiscing about the times Professor Elison Blancaflor, Ph.D., worked with NASA to send plants to space as part of a research project. The data analysis continues.

Just heard about the successful launch of the Falcon 9 rocket on Space X-10 mission this morning at the Kennedy Space Center (#ksc). Reminiscing about the @noble_cell_imaging team's own Advanced Plant Experiments (#apex3) on #spacex5. In January 10, 2015, the Falcon rocket carried @noblefoundation experiments to the International Space Station #iss to better understand how near weightlessness impacts plant growth. Such knowledge will be crucial in developing strategies for #advancedlifesupport systems as humans journey to #space. The upper panel shows signs at the entrance of the lab in the space station processing facility where the #noblefoundation team prepared their plant #experiments. The lower panel shows the Falcon rocket a few days before launching APEX3. As we complete analysis of our data, we might even have some cell images from plants grown in #microgravity in future posts. #plantscience #plantsinspace #outofthisworld #farminginspace #spacefarms #spaceag #everynoblestory #spaceagriculture #nasa #plantbiology #biology #florida #capecanaveral #science #spacebiology #spaceexploration #spaceexperiment #ardmoreok

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  2 Sunday, Feb. 19

The beginnings of what could be a new cultivar someday.

  3 Monday, Feb. 20

"What's that you got there?" Just another day on a research ranch.

  4 Wednesday, Feb. 22

Yun Kang, Ph.D., staff scientist in the Plant Biology Division, shared her findings at the InterDrought-V conference in India. She and Brice Cazenave, Ph.D., a postdoctoral fellow in the Forage Improvement Division, joined hundreds of other scientists from throughout the world to explore possibilities of improving drought- and other stress-tolerance in crops.

  5 Friday, Feb. 24

A close-up view of buckwheat. Noble Research Institute researchers are testing out buckwheat as a cover crop.

#horseshoecrab. Not so fast! We do not work on marine arthropods. @jaydeepkolape took an image of a buckwheat #seed with a table top scanning electron #microscope. #buckwheat is cultivated for its #grain and to make delicious Asian #noodles. But for #noblefoundation researchers, buckwheat is one of many species being considered as a #cover #crop that could be part of a year-round grazing system to benefit #farmers and ranchers in the #southernplains. #covercrops provide numerous benefits for #sustainable #agriculture. They help minimize soil #erosion, enhance #soil physical properties and organic matter, and suppress pests and weeds. From under the lens of a #microscope to the fields of Southern #oklahoma, @noblefoundation #scientists, plant breeders and agronomists are improving #soilhealth and global agriculture one seed at a time. #soils #saveoursoil #agronomy #forages #farming #plantscience #everynoblestory #sustainableagriculture

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