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Last Week in Noble Research: To Space, India and the Ranch

By Courtney Leeper, Writer

Posted Feb. 28, 2017

Noble Research Institute researchers work toward agricultural advancements for the benefit of farmers, ranchers and consumers in the Southern Great Plains and beyond – perhaps even to outer space one day.

Here's a little look at last week in research at the Noble Research Institute.

  1 Sunday, Feb. 19

Reminiscing about the times Professor Elison Blancaflor, Ph.D., worked with NASA to send plants to space as part of a research project. The data analysis continues.

Just heard about the successful launch of the Falcon 9 rocket on Space X-10 mission this morning at the Kennedy Space Center (#ksc). Reminiscing about the @noble_cell_imaging team's own Advanced Plant Experiments (#apex3) on #spacex5. In January 10, 2015, the Falcon rocket carried @noblefoundation experiments to the International Space Station #iss to better understand how near weightlessness impacts plant growth. Such knowledge will be crucial in developing strategies for #advancedlifesupport systems as humans journey to #space. The upper panel shows signs at the entrance of the lab in the space station processing facility where the #noblefoundation team prepared their plant #experiments. The lower panel shows the Falcon rocket a few days before launching APEX3. As we complete analysis of our data, we might even have some cell images from plants grown in #microgravity in future posts. #plantscience #plantsinspace #outofthisworld #farminginspace #spacefarms #spaceag #everynoblestory #spaceagriculture #nasa #plantbiology #biology #florida #capecanaveral #science #spacebiology #spaceexploration #spaceexperiment #ardmoreok

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  2 Sunday, Feb. 19

The beginnings of what could be a new cultivar someday.

  3 Monday, Feb. 20

"What's that you got there?" Just another day on a research ranch.

  4 Wednesday, Feb. 22

Yun Kang, Ph.D., staff scientist in the Plant Biology Division, shared her findings at the InterDrought-V conference in India. She and Brice Cazenave, Ph.D., a postdoctoral fellow in the Forage Improvement Division, joined hundreds of other scientists from throughout the world to explore possibilities of improving drought- and other stress-tolerance in crops.

  5 Friday, Feb. 24

A close-up view of buckwheat. Noble Research Institute researchers are testing out buckwheat as a cover crop.

#horseshoecrab. Not so fast! We do not work on marine arthropods. @jaydeepkolape took an image of a buckwheat #seed with a table top scanning electron #microscope. #buckwheat is cultivated for its #grain and to make delicious Asian #noodles. But for #noblefoundation researchers, buckwheat is one of many species being considered as a #cover #crop that could be part of a year-round grazing system to benefit #farmers and ranchers in the #southernplains. #covercrops provide numerous benefits for #sustainable #agriculture. They help minimize soil #erosion, enhance #soil physical properties and organic matter, and suppress pests and weeds. From under the lens of a #microscope to the fields of Southern #oklahoma, @noblefoundation #scientists, plant breeders and agronomists are improving #soilhealth and global agriculture one seed at a time. #soils #saveoursoil #agronomy #forages #farming #plantscience #everynoblestory #sustainableagriculture

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